Thursday, 27 February 2020

Working with Customers

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Working with Customers


Verbal communication is an essential part of business and when it is executed correctly,
good things happen. Here are a few different ideas and styles to remember when speaking
to anyone in a business setting As we all know that successful customer or client service is
the source of revenue of any business.
An organization can offer promotions and discount their prices to attract new customers,
but repeat business and ongoing relationships are the keys to profitability.
Customer service refers to an organization’s relationship with its customers: meeting
their expectations, listening to their statements, and solving their problems
Active listening means that you stop talking and concentrate on the customer’s words, not
on how to counter their arguments or respond to their claims
Empathy is your capacity to understand another person’s feelings or state of mind
People contact businesses for many reasons, such as to renew services, purchase additional
products, answer questions, or complain about goods and services. When talking to
customers, evaluate the content and delivery of their messages
If a customer’s emotion is apparent, you can comment on it empathetically, especially if
the customer is angry or dissatisfied. Statements such as, “You must have been disappointed
when you received the wrong shipment,” or “I can imagine that you were frustrated when
the product didn’t work properly,” demonstrate that you understand their reaction and
are concerned about solving the problem.
Asking questions helps you listen carefully, clarify messages, encourage customer
communication, and resolve problems. Effective questioning means knowing which
questions to ask, when to ask them, and how to phrase them
Closed questions are specific and concrete, and generally seek a “yes” or “no” answer
When a customer contacts you regarding a problem, demonstrate that you want to resolve
the problem by asking open-ended and closed questions about the details of their
complaint—the who, what, where, when, and how facts. Summarize their responses and
ask, “Is that correct?” Taking time to understand the details establishes rapport and trust,
and helps you identify possible solutions.
People contacting customer service to resolve a problem might be more interested in
offering, not accepting, comments and ideas
When a customer makes a specific request, you sometimes have to deny it. Some companies
train their employees to avoid the word “no” when dealing with customers to prevent
disappointing them
When you must deny a request, soften the refusal by offering an alternative at the same
time, if possible. People appreciate having a choice, and usually perceive your offer as an
effort to help. Conclude your communication by telling the customer what you can do for
them instead of what you can’t do
At some point in your career, you will confront an angry customer, especially if you deal
directly with the public


Active Listening: Active listening means that you stop talking and concentrate on the customer's
words, not on how to counter their arguments or respond to their claims.
Apologies: Apologies are powerful tools that can quickly reduce anger.
Attitudes: Attitudes are contagious, and often your customers take their cues from you.
Closed Questions: Closed questions are specific and concrete, and generally seek a "yes" or "no"
answer.
Customer Service: Customer service refers to an organization's relationship with its customers:
meeting their expectations, listening to their statements, and solving their problems.
Disability: A disability is the lack of physical or mental ability relative to some standard or
norm.
Empathy: Empathy is your capacity to understand another person's feelings or state of mind.
Verbal Communication: Verbal communication can be defined as communicating your thoughts
through words. Such thoughts may be ideas, opinions, directions, dissatisfaction, objections,
your emotions and pleasures.


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